Конспект урока на тему «Graded Dictation exercises»





















































Exercise 1


The sky was dark and cloudy. It was a cold afternoon. Already the snow was falling. Small flakes drifted slowly across the street. Soon the gardens were covered. They looked like great white blankets. Cars drove slowly. Their wheels made no noise. You could not see the path to our house. The flower-beds were like wedding cakes. A bird hopped quickly over one of them. His feet left little arrows. The water in the birdbath was frozen hard. Winter had begun again.

Exercise 2

It was the first warm day of spring. The sun was shining brightly. I decided to go for a stroll in the park. There were buds on the trees. Young birds had hatched out in their nests. Flowers of many kinds were already blooming in the gardens. Others would come out in another week or so. I walked near a fountain. A jet of water was rising into the air. It made a graceful curve. I watched it falling. It splashed into a basin on the fountain. From there it overflowed into a little round pond. Fish were swimming near the surface. How cool it all looked.

Exercise 3
You sit comfortably in a chair. You are aware only of a room. Perhaps a gramophone is playing. You relax. You may even be smoking a cigarette. You have no sense of motion. Yet this is very strange. Actually you are moving at eighteen miles a second. This is the speed of the earth in orbit round the sun. Some of the planets travel more slowly. Their direction is against the clock. You are, in fact, travelling faster than the fastest aeroplane. Few people, however, are troubled by the fact.

Exercise 4
The cat walked towards the dustbin. It had a hungry look on its scratched face. I watched it quietly from my window. Thoughtfully it stopped. It was obviously planning an attack. I could almost see the cunning look in its sharp eyes. It was gazing at something. Now it wore a worried look. It must be the lid. The cat, in no hurry, put its front paws on this. It pushed just like a human. The lid, a large one with a handle, began to move. Little by little the cat pushed it to one side. At this moment the next door cat appeared. It jumped head first into the bin. The resulting noise was terrible.

Exercise 5
A well-dressed man bought a newspaper at the corner of the street. Quickly he turned the pages. He seemed very excited. Obviously he was looking for something. It could hardly be the racing results. These are always on the back page. Presently a worried look appeared on his face. He folded the newspaper very carelessly. At the traffic lights he crossed the road. There was a sound of brakes. A car pulled up two inches from him. He seemed unaware of it. Like a blind man, he stumbled on. What had upset him so badly?

Exercise 6
A Swiss doctor has discovered an interesting character test. He requires you to draw a tree. From your drawing he can tell you many things about yourself. Generally people are doubtful of such methods. They prefer to write answers to questions. Like most observation tests it needs experience. Your writing varies with your moods. A person worrying about something writes carelessly. On feeling happier he writes a more shapely hand. Few people are consistent. Using the tree probably shows the whole person.

Exercise 7
Having few novels I manage to fit them neatly into a small set of shelves. To simplify matters further they are arranged in alphabetical order. The novelists are mainly French and English. Most of them have been dead over a hundred years. I find modern novels rather dull. Of course many people would disagree violently with this. Nevertheless the increasing number of paperback on the market nowadays makes selection essential. My dividing line is 1850. My only other books are dictionaries and works of reference.

Exercise 8
The man in the room next to mine is a very noisy neighbour indeed. Sometimes he has large numbers of friends in for a meal. They talk at the tops of their voices for hours on end. Occasionally I bang loudly on the wall. This does no good whatever. They cannot even hear me. Once I knocked on his door. I complained about the noise. “Noise,” he said, looking extremely puzzled, “what noise?” I gave up after that. At night before turning in he runs the water in his basin for at least half an house. After getting up in the morning he closes his window noisily. Leaving he room he always bangs the door. No wonder I usually look tired.

Exercise 9
Now the trees are bare. The last leaves have been torn away by the autumn gales. The street for miles around are like great brown carpets. Walking home you hear crunching beneath your feet. The sweepers with their long-handled brooms take days to clear up. In the failing light they pile the separate loads from their barrows into one large heap. Paraffin is brought in a battered tin. They pour it over the leaves. Standing well back one of them strikes a match with his roughened hands. Flames mingling with thick white smoke soar upwards. With this familiar smell of a burning bonfire, autumn is under way.
Exercise 10
This friend of mine was unable to stop collecting boxes. He visited the doctor to ask for a cure. The doctor looked very surprised. He even seemed a little angry at hearing the request. He then asked my friend to describe the collection. “Cigarette boxes,” my friend said, “tobacco jars, biscuit tins.” Looking irritable the doctor snapped, “Tins or boxes?” “Both,” my friend replied. Eyeing him suspiciously the doctor shook his head. Finally my friend asked for the address of a larger flat. The old one was packed out with tins. Unable to take him seriously the doctor asked him to leave.









































Exercise 1
A starling made a nest under the roof last year. For several days strange sounds could heard coming from under the guttering. Earlier we had seen two starlings flying around there. Each bird carried a twig in its beak. They would disappear, and then, reappear to fly off in search of more material for their nest. On one trip the cock bird carried a huge lead. Energetically the hen helped him to push it through the entrance under the roof. So it continued for many days, each journey resulting in larger and larger finds. Then one afternoon we heard sounds of chirping coming from the attic and were not surprised on seeing the cause of it. Sitting on the roof were the mother and father bird looking proudly at six little creatures ranged in the line beside them.

Exercise 2
One night a gale blew several slates off our roof. The next morning we sent for the builder. He arrived with half a dozen ladders and long lengths of rope. He had an assistant and together they climbed on to the top of the house. The assistant was new to the job, and there seemed to be a lot of confusion. He invariably failed to understand his instructions. Attempting to fasten a rope round the chimney he knocked off several more slates. He was equally useless with a hammer and hit his thumb more often than the nails in the slates. Finally his weight proved too much for the chimney pot. Foolishly he had put the rope round it, and he slid as far as the guttering. Luckily it supported him, but our repair bill was extremely high.





Exercise 3
Recently I read a science fiction story about a missing robot. It had hidden itself among fifty others and it could not be distinguished from them. The designer ordered all except the missing one to step forward, but the whole lot moved. Obviously one of them was lying. The designer was baffled. He gave them various orders and watched for a false move. The missing one proved too cunning for him. He then questioned each one in turn but he was still unsuccessful. In desperation he made one final attempt. He called them together and spoke of an extra knob on the missing one’s ears. Watching them very carefully he was one robot slyly raise its hand and feel its ear.

Exercise 4
Choosing a tie is not every man’s idea of pleasure. To choose for one’s self is difficult enough, but to be obliged to pick one out for a friend is sheet agony. Usually a man will leave the latter responsibility to his wife. Her confidence in dealing with the request staggers the mere male and he thinks disloyally of the graveyard of neckwear in his own wardrobe. But better to let he take the blame than own it to himself. How strange that the area below the chin should be the scene of man’s most personal expression. Not in the suit, nor the hat, nor even the shoes does personality begin but in a little, barely visible strip of material surrounding the neck. Sensing this, man is understandably reluctant to commit himself.






Exercise 5
In this age you can get a book that tells you how to do anything. Recently I wanted to know something about home plumbing. This comes from living in an extraordinary house. The wiring was obviously done by a plumber and the plumbing by an electrician. I did not however buy a book on electrical work. It would perhaps have been wiser, but at the time I failed to see the logic of this. I wanted to put some power points into one of the bedrooms and to rewire the garage. It was also in my mind to fix up a light in the attic. I switched off at the main and set to. Later I switched on again and there was a nasty flash. Happening to look out of the window I could not see a light anywhere. I had fused the entire district.

Exercise 6
Walking round a museum has never been my idea of spending a free afternoon. I like visiting the places well enough but I detest all the foot-work. For a joke a friend suggested going in a wheelchair. I didn’t take this seriously at first, but then the practicality of it came home to me. Accordingly I hired a chair and set off for the museum district. The attendants were very kind and carried me bodily, chair and all, inside on the ground floor. The chair was worked by an electric motor. For half an hour I had a very leisurely time, but then the inevitable happened. The machinery went wrong and the chair refused to stop. The museum was in an uproar. To the surprise of the attendants I leapt from the chair and it then came to a halt against the wall. I had quite a lot of explaining to do.





Exercise 7
Finding myself without matched I entered the nearest tobacconist’s and asked for a box. It was raining heavily at the time and the doorway of the shop was crowded. The people seemed to suspect me of also wishing to find shelter and they showed considerable reluctance in moving. I had to push strenuously but finally I managed to reach the counter. At this moment the tobacconist, in a loud voice, ordered us all out of the shop. I started to protest but he took no notice whatsoever. The people nearest the doorway refused to budge. Those behind shrugged their shoulders, and pointed to those in front. The tobacconist shook his head and disappeared into the back of the shop. I waited for fifteen minutes but I never got that box of matches.

Exercise 8
There has been a lot of talk recently about putting England on the metric system. From an international point of view this would undoubtedly be a good thing, but internally it would make no sense whatever. However the latter is purely selfish consideration, and ultimately England’s trading relationship with other countries determines her economy. Consequently the twelve or duodecimal system will have to give way to one involving tens. The cost of this conversion will be enormous and will probably incur a longstanding debt. But you cannot argue with progress. Already the country has accepted the logarithm and in doing so is surely half way to thoroughly digesting the number ten.































Exercise 1
The tide went out so quickly that it did not take the shore long to dry. There were of course a number of little pools which always had water in them. If you looked carefully you could see some form of life in them, though it was often not possible to say at first sight what it was. Once, I remember, I found a baby crab. It was walking from side to side and did not seem able to make up its mind what to do. Sometimes when the water had come in a long way I found a starfish. There were usually a good many shells, most of which were empty. Sometimes I took a bag with me to collect them. The prettiest one that I ever saw was a small cockle. The only thing that spoiled the beach was the amount of paper left behind by the visitors.

Exercise 2
We found the flat quite by chance when we were walking one Saturday afternoon. We were going to visit some friends who lived on the other side of town, but we reached the station too early. The best way, we thought, to kill time would be to take a walk. As we were strolling down this street of old houses we saw the notice in a first-floor window. We rang the agents on Monday morning and they said we could have the keys as soon as we liked. The place was quite clean, though it needed a little paint. The rent was very low, and the agent agreed to let us have it for only six months. Everything had gone so easily that we began to suspect a catch. We spent a week painting and cleaning the rooms before we moved in. It was a month later that the knocking began at night.





Exercise 3
The other day I came across a very interesting essay on writing. To write a language well, the author said, it was necessary to know what materials were available. You also needed to know how best to use them. Good writing was like building and just as a man putting up a house knew about bricks and mortar so a writer should know about the use of words. The builder understood foundations, different types of wood, and makes of glass. He knew how to construct a roof which would be secure against the weather, so that the house was dry. A writer could take what he needed from a dictionary, while a grammar would show him how to arrange his material. In this way the writer could make his sentences safe from vagueness. The greatest secret, the author thought, was to make your thoughts as simple as possible.

Exercise 4
We had been flying for over an hour when the captain of the plane sent round a note. It gave details of the flight such as height, speed, the distance we had travelled, and our present position. We passed the piece of paper from one to another, and for me it served as an excuse to begin a conversation with my fellow-passenger. He was a man old enough to be my father. He seemed shy and a little puzzled by this whole business of being several miles above the earth. He told me he was going to visit his daughter, whom he had not seen for ten years. When I asked him if he liked flying he told me quite simply that he had never flown in his life before. He liked the idea very much, he said, but added that secretly he was more than a little afraid of it. After that we continued to talk until we landed.




Exercise 5
Last year I planned to spend my holidays at a small seaside hotel. It was a long way from the nearest town and I had decided on the place because I wanted solitude. I had doubts about my choice the moment I got out of the train, which stopped at a very dismal station. There was no sign of a porter, who might help me with my luggage, nor did there appear to be a ticket-collector. I walked through the barrier carrying my two suitcases but I was soon exhausted by the effort and had to stop. A taxi, which looked like the most ancient thing on four wheels, stood in the station yard. Although the driver was asleep over the wheel, I managed to wake him. When I asked him to take me to the hotel he looked very puzzled and scratched his head. Finally he told me the hotel had been burned down two months before.

Exercise 6
Clothes are bought ready-made or tailor-made. A man’s suit can be either single-breasted or double-breasted. The latter means it buttons across. Once there were no top pockets in suits, but today all men’s suits have them, and on formal occasion a white handkerchief is worn there. A suit I saw yesterday, however, had no top pocket. It had side pockets, an inside or wallet pocket, and a little pocket outside, a Victorian survival, called a ticket pocket. The trousers had no turn-ups, but there were two hip-pockets, instead of the usually one. There were, of course, trouser pockets. Waistcoats are full of pockets, but as you know, they have no sleeves. Women also wear suits, consisting of jackets and skirts. Often they wear dresses and long dresses for formal wear are called evening gowns. But evening dress for a man means black clothes, a single or double-breasted dinner jacket worn with a black bow tie. Some men still wear the long coats called tails, and with these go white ties. A proverb says, fine feather make fine birds.


Exercise 7
There was a garden at both the front and the back of the house. The front garden was the usual formal pocket handkerchief of green lawn bordered by various interesting types of flowers. There was a path leading to the front door, and that was that. However the back garden was more like a garden. There was a lawn of sorts though a good half of it had been allowed to grow wild. There were numerous flower-beds alive with hollyhocks and wallflowers, and here and there one saw tulips and rose trees. In one corner stood a greenhouse, which in winter was used as a hot-house. Here tomatoes and several other vegetables were forced before the season. Other vegetables were grown outdoors beside the greenhouse in a kitchen garden. There were leeks and carrots, spinach and lettuces and, ambitiously, someone had once tried to grow celery. In a deckchair on a hot day, there was no pleasanter place to sit.

Exercise 8
In an open-air zoo, you can see many varieties of animals living; although in captivity, in almost natural surroundings. Camels trot around peacefully with their large humps bobbing up and down much as one imagines them in the East. In the giraffe enclosure you can see these odd-looking creatures coming right up to the railings and stretching their long necks over and down; to be fed by the visitors. They have even been known to gobble the feathers on a lady’s hat. Feeding the elephants is a never-failing source of joy to young and old alike. Their long trunks wave towards your hand and the currant bun that awaits them. Sometimes however they become annoyed if you have no food for them and are quite likely to fill their trunks from a bucket and spray you. An umbrella will not help you.



Exercise 9
The bridge was long and narrow, spanning the wide stream that flowed quickly between the green banks. One or two swans glided slowly at the water’s edge beside some reeds. The man leant over the parapet and watched the swirling water disappearing under the arches. Several branches and leaves were turning around caught by the strong current and once he saw a whole newspaper floating by opened out. It was too deep to spot any fish though he saw beneath the surface several dark shapes that could have been alive. He heard a frog croaking and noticed a sudden movement at the water’s edge. There was a splash and a series of small rings formed in the shallow water. Then he saw two lines like an arrowhead moving towards the bank. He made out the almost human swimming motion of the tiny legs. But behind them in hot pursuit was one of the swans.

Exercise 10
The area was protected by railings, and I went down into it from the street by means of stone steps; A door at the bottom opened into the basement where I found myself in an old-fashioned type of kitchen. Nothing seemed to have changed for the last hundred years, including the fine layer of dust over everything. Saucepans and frying pans hung in long rows on a large Victorian dresser, and on a shelf there was even an ancient knife-cleaner. A large coffee-grinder with an enormous handle stood beside it, and on the mantelpiece opposite was a giant nineteenth-century alarm clock with two bells that would have put Big Ben to shame. The oven might have come straight out of a museum and the sink in the scullery was big enough to have a bath in. For the moment it was piled high with used crockery.
Свежие документы:  Решение задач на расчет давления жидкости на дно и стенки сосуда, 7 класс

14


скачать материал

Хочешь больше полезных материалов? Поделись ссылкой, помоги проекту расти!


Ещё документы из категории Английский язык: